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Anna Karenina Short-Listed for 2015 Read Russia Prize

Anna Karenina coverI've just learned that my translation of Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina has been short-listed for the 2015 Read Russia Prize!

I'm in stellar company: Oliver Ready, Jamie Rann, Rosamund Bartlett, Katherine Dovlatov, and Peter Daniels, and so is Tolstoy, the other authors represented being Fyodor Dostoevsky, Vladislav Khodasevich, Vladimir Sharov, Sergei Dovlatov, and Anna Starobinets.

The prize will be awarded on Friday, May 29, at the Grolier Club in New York City.

Deep Vellum Publishes Mikhail Shishkin's "Calligraphy Lesson: The Collected Stories"

calligraphylessoncoverCalligraphy Lesson: The Collected Stories, by Mikhail Shishkin, has just been published by that exciting new indie publisher Deep Vellum, out of Dallas--yes, Dallas.

Four of the eight pieces were translated by me, including the title story, "Calligraphy Lesson," along with "Language Saved," "The Blind Musician," and "In a Boat Scratched on a Wall." The remaining four were translated by my fine colleagues Leo Shtutin, Sylvia Maizell, and Mariya Bashkatova.

Shishkin was the first (and still the only) writer to win the three major Russian literary awards (the Russian Booker, National Bestseller, and Big Book Awards). He is a master prose writer in the timeless, breathtakingly beautiful style of the greatest Russian writers, such as Leo Tolstoy, Ivan Bunin, and Boris Pasternak. Calligraphy Lesson: The Collected Stories will be Shishkin's third work available in English, previously published were his novels Maidenhair (Open Letter) and The Light and the Dark (Quercus).

To order your copy, click here.

"How Russians Lost the War" by Mikhail Shishkin

"How Russians Lost the War," Mikhail Shishkin's op-ed piece on the occasion of Victory Day (New York Times, March 10, 2015) explains the grievous truth that the unimaginable sacrifices made by the Russian people during World War II did not, in the end, bring them victory.  They saved themselves from hitler only to remain in Stalin's thrall: "The great victory only reinforced their great slavery."

Stalin and the Soviet Union are gone, but the war's legacy is very much present: "Once again, the dictatorship is calling on its subjects to defend the homeland, mercilessly exploiting the propaganda of victory in the Great Patriotic War. Russia's rulers have stolen my people's oil, stolen their elections, stolen their country. And stolen their victory."

Read the complete essay here.

Olga Bukhina reviews Daria Wilke's "Playing a Part"

PlayingAPart coverRussian scholar and translator Olga Bukhina has written a smart and thoughtful review my translation of Daria Wilke's Playing a Part in Worlds of WordsIn particular, I'm very grateful for how she contextualizes the gay theme that was so newsworthy when the book first came out in Russian:

"This is a first book for young readers in Russia which openly involves gay characters, and may be the last because of the new Russian law that prohibits mentioning a gay theme in books for readers under 18. The designated age is to be displayed on the cover of all books. . . . In this coming of age novel, the focus on being gay stands for the many choices adolescents need to make. First of all, is freedom of choice, any choice, not only of sexual orientation. It is also about the need to stand against the peer pressure and to search for one's individual way."

Gary Saul Morson on "The Moral Urgency of Anna Karenina"

In the April issue of Commentary, Professor Gary Saul Morson, who wrote an introduction and notes to my translation of Anna Kareninalooks closely at Tolstoy's great insight into "what is truly important in human lives":

We tend to think that true life is lived at times of high drama. When Anna Karenina reads a novel on the train, she wants to live the exciting incidents described. Both high literature and popular culture foster the delusion that ordinary, prosaic happiness represents something insufferably bourgeois, a suspension of real living. Forms as different as romantic drama, adventure stories, and tragedies suggest that life is truly lived only in moments of great intensity.

Tolstoy thought just the opposite.

Read the rest of the article here.